Going Shopping! Comparing prices, U.S. versus El Salvador   Leave a comment

Here is another cost of living article, noting differences between El Salvador and the U.S.

I’m taking you with me on a “Tour du Store”.  We’ll walk through the aisles together, and I’ll point out things I bought, and saw, and tell you how it compares to  products and pricing in El Salvador.

Our shopping trip takes place in the Market Basket, a fantastic grocery chain in New England, famous for its low prices and international product selection.  They beat the pants off the stupid Publix my mom goes to in Florida, that store would never have my business.  Pics are from late September, 2012.

Mmmm BUTTER. In E.S. it’s $1 (a dollar) a stick,
usually sold a stick at a time.   67 cents a stick in
U.S.   Are Dairy Subsidies helping this?
EGGS.  Same or More $ in El Salvador.
Package of 15 about 2 bucks or 2.25+ in E.S.
Farm fresh at mom-in-laws 8 for a dollar – exact price
as seen here.

There’s a “weird” egg thing I finally figured out in El Salvador.  Eggs are sold in stores at room temperature, which I always thought was, especially when the air temp is 80 or higher in most places there.   Here’s WHY:   if you refrigerate eggs and then stop refrigerating them, they spoil fast.  People in El Salvador usually have smaller fridges or no fridge at all, so stores sell them at room temp to accommodate this.   Eggs will also spoil fast if you get them wet, according to my husband.

Here are the CHICKENS that laid those eggs.   Based on this grocery trip, chicken in El Salvador costs MORE.   At Super Selectos grocery stores in El Salvador, as of August of 2012 and long before that, the cheapest price for “leg quarters” I could find was 1.49 or so.   The picture above shows that here in the U.S. I find them for 20 cents cheaper.    Now, you CAN find cheaper chicken at the MARKET in El Salvador – look for the “Pollo Indio” there, for probably 1.25 or 1.30, so that is one option.  MARKET food in El Salvador is lots cheaper than the grocery store, so make use of it when you can.

I mentioned the Chicken pricing difference to my husband, and he reminded me that in El Salvador the price of chicken feed is probably more, comparatively.    Corn is a big component of chicken feed, and most people know about the corn subsidies we have in the U.S.   Also, farmers in general get a lot of assistance from the government in the U.S.

Personally, I think mega farm factories need not have so many subsidies, but that’s a discussion that belongs on someone elses blog, so I’ll stop there. Ya’ll can watch Food, Inc. and Forks over Knives on your own time.

YOGURT – same price in El Salvador.   It’s not quite mainstream in El Salvador, and I’m not sure it’s produced there if at all, so the Yoplait yogurt pictured here has an exact same price and quality corollary in E.S. called ‘Yes’.   Say yes to yes if you like yogurt, it’s good.    TUNA – wow, what a great price the U.S. has – on sale for 80 cents a can.  I NEVER found Tuna for less than $1 a can, and almost always 1.25 or 1.50, and often “mixed with vegetables” at that price.   The poor man’s best protein option in El Salvador is still, by far, BEANS.

Let’s make a sandwich and have a snack.    PACKAGED HAM  – about the SAME prices as El Salvador.   I used to buy packs of ham down there for around 3 bucks each, and they were ‘higher end’.  “DANI'” brand ham, which is not as good as this Market Basket kind, was 2 dollars and change, about the same as this 8 oz bag of ham, $2.29 at MB.   CHEESES of European or American Style kind, as in hard or sharp tasting, cost MORE there.   This Muenster cheese seen here is cheaper > in E.S. and you’re also getting the “store” brand discount, $2.99 for 10 oz, so about 5 bucks a pound.  El Salvador?  $7-9 a pound, much MORE for Muenster cheese.   Because it’s not made there far as I know so you’re paying for an imported product.   Hard sliceable style cheeses are hardly ever made there, and when so, a niche product.  There’s a store called “Greif” or something like that which makes cheeses and specialty packaged meats.  European food, and European style prices.   The cake on the far right is more of an American-style sweet, I found cakes the same size for around $2.50 or $3.00 in El Salvador.   Most Salvadorans eat “pan dulce” which are bakery-fresh cookies sold at the grocer or often on the back of trucks or bicycled around the neighborhood.

Onions and Potatoes.  SAME price in El Salvador.  American price =  about the same as the “veggie” truck in El Salvador.  Market price in El Salvador would be slightly less.    I was surprised to see I was getting about the same amount of vegetable’s worth for a $1 as I would back in El Salvador.

Bathroom needs.  El Salvador’s pricing is EXACTLY or ALMOST the same!   Shampoo and other GROOMING products offer no 3rd world discount, so be prepared.   Colgate – manufactured in Latin America, and maybe right there in good old Salvy-land, is sold for pretty much the same price as here – I don’t remember seeing regular size tubes of toothpaste for < $1 in El Salvador.    TP – the “Nevax” brand I bought in El Salvador was somewhere between the Quilted Northern and Angel Soft brands here in terms of quality, and cost about $2.50 – 2.70 or so, depending on the store in El Salvador.  Sometimes I’d catch a sale at $2.25 a package, and would buy extra .

And now for the GOOD NEWS:   El Salvador beats the United States HANDS DOWN with tropical fruits and veggies.   I would hope so!

These PLANTAINS at 3 for a buck in Market Basket are much smaller  > their Salvadoran counterparts.   Plantains are about 5 for a dollar in El Salvador, and way bigger.   If you go to the market you get an even better deal > the veggie truck.  AVOCADOS are either 3 for a dollar or 2 for a dollar at the most down there.   Since I was in the great Market Basket food haven, these avocados are a buck each, but in other stores would be $1.29 or 1.50 apiece.   Avocados are considered a pricier vegetable in El Salvador, and not always available, but often grow on people’s trees, along with bananas, oranges and mangos.

This PAPAYA in the U.S. is about $3.25 after weighing it in.   I selected one the same size as I’d find down there for anywhere from $1 to $1.50 total.  Nice to see they’re less than half the cost in El Salvador.

Gee, CABBAGE heads are a wee bit SMALL in the United States.   They grow cabbage in the mountains of El Salvador, way up in places like La Palma, or Las Pilas, or El Pital or San Fernando de Morazan, all mountainous areas of Chalatenango.     We drove by patches around there.    Cabbage heads in el Salvador are MONDO sized compared to the ones here, and cost about $1 each, maybe $1.50, $2 tops for super big mondo size.     This head in the U.S. is about half the size, maybe 2/3 tops of what you’d find down there and cost a total of $1.20.      So like the papaya, the cost for cabbage in El Salvador is half or less > the U.S.

BEANS and SUGAR:   El Salvador wins.  Heck, they better, stuff is grown there, right?   When we left El Salvador, beans were .60-.75 a pound.   They’re about $1.50 a pound here.  I cannot remember the exact price for sugar down there, but it feels like we’re paying twice as much here.  No problem,we make lots more, right?

COFFEE  – a mixed bag.   Coffee SHOULD be cheaper down in El Salvador, but I did not observe that while we were there.  Bags of coffee for a coffee machine range anywhere from $4-$7 a bag there, about the same as here, I think.   Instant coffee seems more expensive here > in El Salvador, and that’s a good thing, bc most poor people I know drink Nescafe Cafe Listo down there – a product you don’t find here.

MANGOS.   El Salvador WINS the mango prize.  In El Salvador, during season, mangos are ubiquitous, and there  a dozen or more varieties.

This type of mango pictured above sells for 3 for $1, sometimes 5 for a dollar in El Salvador in the market and via street vendors.  Super Selectos might be as high as 60-70 cents a mango if not mid-season, but you always pay more for produce there > at the market.   Even so, mangos are half or less than what they cost here.

What’s more, in many places in El Salvador, mangos are FREE!  They grow all over the place so people are picking them off of trees everywhere, and selling them on the roadside, you almost cant get rid of them.

A good mango story for you:  When my husband and his friends get together and talk about hard times between the two countries, they almost always mention mangos.  “Yeah,” one will say, “When I’m out of work in the U.S. I’ve still gotta pay rent, insurance, the whole bit.  But back home I can always live free with family, and if I’m hungry, I can ALWAYS EAT MANGOS OFF THE TREES.”   There’s no free fruits and veggies growing wild (or considered common property) over here.   Prices are cheaper in the U.S., but like they say, there’s no such thing as a free lunch!

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Two other Cost of Living in El Salvador (versus the U.S.) that may interest you:

Sticker shock going both ways for a Thanksgiving tribute to American consumerism, and
Some Stuff Costs Less, Some Costs more  with lots of details to help expats living in El Salvador

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